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The Astronomical Unit (AU):
Mercury/Sun Distance

Charles William Johnson

The astronomical unit (AU) currently in use is derived from the average mean distance between the Earth and the Sun, which is generally cited as 93,000,000 miles or 149,600,000 kilometers. We should like to make a proposal that the average mean distance between the planet Mercury and the Sun be considered for computations of the astronomical unit. The average mean distance between Mercury and the Sun is generally cited as being 36,000,000 miles or, 57,900,000 kilometers.

The logic of the proposal is obvious. If one is viewing the solar system as a system of relationships, it would seem acceptable to consider the nearest planet to the Sun, or the farthest planet from the Sun (Pluto) as representing a possible unit of measurement. These two extreme relationships within the system determine the parameters of the system of gravitation within the system; acting as its natural limits. It does not seem at all acceptable to employ the Earth/Sun distance for the astronomical unit of measurement, given the fact that it lies somewhere within the system, not as one of the system's defining or manifest parameters, by itself determined by those parameters.

Furthermore, one immediately recognizes the advantage a unit of measurement for the astronomical unit as that of the distance Mercury/Sun, given the fact that the 36c coincides with the ancient reckoning day-count (360c). We have already discussed this particular theme in a previous extract, where we examined a relationship between the Mercury/Sun distance and the planets' atmospheric conditions.

When one employs the Mercury/Sun distance as the astronomical unit for other measurements and aspects within the solar system, very distinct patterns emerge. We shall review a few of these patterns and aspects in this extract. But, we are certain that many other patterns and aspects are going to emerge, not only with regard to our solar system, but with regard to measurements in the rest of the Universe. For now, however, we shall limit our analyses to our solar system, reserving further comment on the Universe for another essay.

Some Patterns: Mercury/Sun as the Astronomical Unit (AU)

The corresponding numbers for the proportional representation, utilizing the planet Earth as the unit one for measurement for the astronomical unit (AU), are given below:

Mercury .39 [.3870320856]  
Venus .72 [.7232620321]  
Earth 1.0 [1.0]  
Mars 1.52 [1.523395722]  
      [Planetoids; asteroids]
Jupiter 5.2 [5.202540107]  
Saturn 9.54 [9.552139037]  

[Recognized Break]
Uranus 19.18 [19.21791444]  
Neptune

30.06

[30.10695187]  

Pluto

39.52 [39.43850267]  

We have employed the numbers rounded off that are generally cited in textbooks and almanacs. From the previous table, generally a break is shown to exist between Saturn and Uranus. One set of precise numbers is given in the brackets, but these would vary as the interpretations of the mean distances vary themselves. Ultimately, one would choose numbers and then make the necessary adjustments depending upon the set of numbers chosen.

Now, if we employ the distance Mercury/Sun as the unit of measurement for the astronomical unit (AU), then, the following numbers arise:

AU Ratios Expressed in Miles:

Mercury 1.0  
Venus 1.86859426  
Earth 2.583325718  
Mars 3.936156024  

[Planetoids; asteroids]
Jupiter 13.44000495  
Saturn 24.68341859  

Uranus

49.64745547  
Neptune

77.78485764

 

Pluto

102.1566695  

AU Ratios Expressed in Kilometers

Mercury 1.0  
Venus 1.868739206  
Earth 2.583765112  
Mars 3.936096718  

[Planetoids; asteroids]
Jupiter 13.44214161  
Saturn 24.68048359  

Uranus

49.65457685  
Neptune

77.78929188

 

Pluto

101.8998273  

(The slight discrepancy concerns the rounded off numbers from distinct sources for miles and kilometers for the distances of the planets from the Sun. However, it is the range that we are concerned with at this point of the discussion, and we should remember that we are dealing with "average mean distances", which vary in the methods used for the computations.)

These numbers would produce distinct relationships, but all within the mean distances. For example, the numbers would produce a range relating to Venus' orbital timing. The range of numbers is much more acceptable from the perspective of a unit-scale, given the fact that the numbers now range from 1.0 to 102.1, almost creating a perfect 100-unit scale. And, in fact, adjustments could be made in order to create such an astronomical scale for our solar system.

The scale reveals different patterns, but one such example concerns the two inner progressions that are visible, and which concern the inner and the outer planets as commonly known.

AU Ratios Expressed in Miles:

Mercury 1.0  
Venus 1.86859426
Earth 2.583325718 [numerical progression]
Mars 3.936156024
Belt of Asteroids

 
Jupiter 13.44000495
Saturn 24.68341859

Uranus

49.64745547 [numerical progression]
Neptune

77.78485764

Pluto

102.1566695

One may immediately recognize the advantage of employing the Mercury/Sun distance as the basic unit of measurement within the solar system. The numeric progressions recognize the break between Mars and Jupiter, where most of the "minor planets" or "planetoids" are found; what are more properly known as the "asteroids". By using the Mercury/Sun distance as the astronomical unit, then, the belt of asteroids within our solar system finds its rightful place within the discerned pattern. This does not occur within the pattern created by the use of the distance Earth/Sun for the astronomical unit, as we viewed earlier.

By maintaining the planet Mercury as the unit measurement of our analytical system, other aspects may be considered in this regard. Consider, for example, the tilt of the planets in our solar system with regard to the plane of the ecliptic of Earth.

SUN 7 o / 7 = 1.0
           
Mercury 7 o / 7 = 1.0
Venus 3.4 o / 7 = .485714285
Earth 0 o / 7 = .142857142
Mars 1.9 o / 7 = .271428571
Jupiter 1.3 o / 7 = .185714285
Saturn 2.5 o / 7 = .357142857
Uranus .8 o / 7 = .114284714
Neptune 1.8 o / 7 = .257142857
Pluto 17.2 o / 7 = 2.4571428

The resulting pattern, regarding the tilt in degrees of angle to the plane of the ecliptic of Earth, is as follows:

SUN 1.0 Differences  

    0
Mercury 1.0  
    .514285715
Venus .485714285  
    .342857143
Earth .142857142  
    .128571429
Mars .271428571  

.085714286
Jupiter .185714285  
    .171428572
Saturn .357142857  
    .242857143
Uranus .114284714  
    .142857143
Neptune .257142857  

    2.199999993  
Pluto 2.4571428    

Once more, the pattern reflects the break between Mars and Jupiter and concerns the belt of asteroids.

Other patterns exist. Let us consider one other example in this extract. The tilt of the axes of the planets follows:

Planet Degrees Tilt of Axis
Mercury 0o
Venus 3o
Earth 23.45o
Mars 25o
Jupiter 3.1o
Saturn 26.7o
Uranus 82.1o
Neptune 28.8o
Pluto 68 o

Now, let us observe the differences between the corresponding degrees of tilt. In this case, our task is made easy, because Mercury already acts as a basic unit of measurement, given the fact that it registers zero degrees of tilt.

Planet
Degrees Tilt of Axis
Differences
 
Mercury 0o  
    3
Venus 3o  
    20.45
Earth 23.45o  
    1.55
Mars 25o  

    21.9
Jupiter 3.1o  
    23.6
Saturn 26.7o  
    55.4
Uranus 82.1o  
    53.3
Neptune 28.8o  

    39.2  
Pluto 68o    

Further consider the secondary pattern of symmetry below:

Mars 25o
Jupiter 3.1o
Saturn 26.7o

And, yet another:

   
Saturn 26.7o
Uranus 82.1o
Neptune 28.8o

Many interesting relationships appear when one considers the distance Mercury/Sun as the astronomical unit of measurement. Other appear when Mercury is simply taken as the basic unit of measurement for other aspects, such as degrees of tilt in the axes of the planets and with respect to the plane of the ecliptic of Earth. There are far too many relationships to be examined in this brief essay.

One particular relationship that caught our attention is the following:

101.8998273 / 3.936096718 = 25.88854761 [precession today, 25800]

101.89 / 3.93 = 25.92620865 [historical precession number 25920c]

In the previous example between the numbers of Mars (3.93) and Pluto (101.89), we see a relationship with the fractal expression of the numbers relating to the precession, or the Great Cycle. Given the fact that Mars and Pluto represent the last planet of each of the internal progression patterns within the solar system, this somehow causes one to wonder about the significance of these relationships and their numbers.

Or, consider the relationship between Mars and Jupiter, which reflects the significant break in numebrs.

Expressed in miles:

13.44000495 / 3.936156024 = 3.414500052
    6.829000105
    13.65800021

Expressed in Kilometers:

13.44214162 / 3.936096718 = 3.415094339
    6.830188678
    13.66037736

Without considering the distinction between these numbers, coming from different sources, the significant point is to recognize a similarity with the maya long-count companion number, 1366560.

Observations

In this extract, we have made the specific proposal to employ the distance Mercury/Sun, 36,000,000 miles, to represent the astronomical unit (AU) for measurement within astronomy. By employing the distance Mercury/Sun as the astronomical unit (AU), 36,000,000 miles, various advantages obtain.

The commonly cited division between the inner and outer planets is then maintained, and patterns obtain that are relational to this apparent division in the solar system. The natural break between Mars and Jupiter, between which lies the Belt of Asteroids, takes on its significant meaning within the symmetry of patterns that obtain from using the astronomical unit based on the distance Mercury/Sun. The false break that obtains from using the Earth/Sun distance as the astronomical unit thereby disappears.

By using the astronomical unit (AU) based on the 36,000,000 mile average mean distance between Mercury and the Sun, one is able to accommodate computations in relation to the ancient reckoning system which was based on a 360c day-count. Furthermore, by utilizing the 36c as the AU, one is then able to perform other computations more easily since the 36c is a nine-based (9c) number system. The 36c is far superior the 93c currently in use in computational math, which is based on the 93,000,000 mile figure for the Earth/Sun distance.

[PDF] Phi Patterns in Nature and Beyond

Johnson, DM Pirich, H O'Connor… - THE … - pentagon.kappamuepsilon.org
... Charles William Johnson postulates the existence of such a pattern in “The Distance of the Planets
from the Sun and their Atmospheric Com- position.” The conjecture hinges upon the inclusion
of Ceres as a dwarf planet. ... earthmatrix... html. [8] R. Johnson, Miller & Freund's ...

The Distance of the Planets from the Sun And Their Atmospheric Composition

*****

2000-2013 Copyrighted by Charles William Johnson. All rights reserved.

Your comments and suggestions are greatly appreciated:
e-mail: johnson@earthmatrix.com


Earth/matriX
Science in Ancient Artwork
The Astronomical Unit (AU): Mercury/Sun Distance
Extract 65

29 September, 2000
2000-2013 Copyrighted by Charles W. Johnson. All Rights Reserved

Earth/matriX,
P.O. Box 231126 New Orleans, LA 70183-1126; USA
Reproduction prohibited without written consent of the author.


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